Bolick Named to AZ Supreme Court

I don't have much to add to this story, but I was simply thrilled Clint Bolick was named to the AZ Supreme Court.  I have admired his work for years and I think most folks in AZ who know him consider him to be fair-minded and about as non-partisan as one can be in these times.  I love the IJ, which he co-founded, and his work at Goldwater (particularly opposition to a bunch of crony subsidies for real estate and sports teams) has been terrific.

I was a little surprised at all the vitriol at the national level that came from progressive groups over this appointment.  My sense is that he shares a lot more common ground with progressives than, say, many AZ Republicans would (compare, for example, Joe Arpaio or John Kavanagh).  My only guess here is that his record is too good on helping the ordinary people progressives claim to help.

Update:  Last part asked and answered:

Here’s a point worth pondering: Why is it that the so-called progressives, who incessantly say they’re concerned about the plight of poor people, never fight against the laws and regulations that take property from poor people and prevent them from engaging in honest businesses? Why is there no left-wing counterpart to IJ?

The answer, I submit, is that progressives are more concerned about preserving the myth that big government is the one and only friend of the poor than they are about the poor as individuals. Each time a lawyer like Clint Bolick wins a case that enables a poor American to gain when the yoke of government is removed from his shoulders, that myth frays a little more.

  • Alby Dürer

    GoldWATER, not GoldMAN.

  • http://klout.com/#/ilovegrover Thane_Eichenauer

    Interesting slip huh?

  • slocum

    This, in the NY Times, doesn't seem vitriolic -- it definitely highlights Bolick's occasional conflicts with Republicans is going after cronyism.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/26/us/goldwater-institute-an-aggressive-conservative-watchdog.html?_r=0

  • JW

    Why? Faith. Pure, undying faith.

    Belief in the powerful, but benevolent gubmint is as rational as in a powerful, but benevolent deity.

  • David in Michigan

    Sounds like a good choice for judge. However, I have a deep distrust of lawyers and activist judges. Let's let this run a few years and then revisit the selection.