Even at the Margin With Capital Charges Sunk, Light Rail Economics are Awful

A reader and frequent contributor sent me this:

When 120,000 people head to downtown Orlando for the big July 4 fireworks show at Lake Eola, none will be getting on SunRail.

It’s not running.

Central Florida’s $1 billion commuter-rail line usually only operates Monday through Friday, and while a few special weekend events in recent months have booked the train, one of the biggest gatherings of the year won’t.

Fireworks at the Fountain, in addition to the sky show, will feature more than 25 vendors, live music and children’s activities.

But Orlando city staff researched the addition of SunRail service, but found it wouldn’t work, said Cassandra Lafser, the city’s public information officer.

“Several factors contributed to this decision, including safety, availability and costs,” Lafser said in a prepared statement.

“The city’s concerns included: total train capacity, safety and security, hours of operation, pedestrian wayfinding and transport operations between the downtown stations and Lake Eola, and funding availability.”

So, even in a situation where capital costs are sunk and can be ignored, an incremental decision to operate the train on a very heavy commuter day makes no economic sense.  You want to know why?  Because it makes no economic sense Monday through Friday either.  Light rail never pays back any of its capital costs, but the vast majority of light rail loses money operationally at the margin as well.