LA Proposes to Institutionalize Red-Lining Poor Neighborhoods

For years, banks have been sued for "red-lining" poor neighborhoods, meaning they were accused of purposefully avoiding doing business in these poor areas.  National retail chains have been accused of something similar, causing poorer the oft-commented-on irony that poorer neighborhoods often have the highest retail prices.

The City of Los Angeles seems to like this practice and wants to pass new legislation aimed at further limiting retail choices in poorer neighborhoods:

"Amid worries of an obesity epidemic and its related illnesses,
including high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease, Los Angeles
officials, among others around the country, are proposing to limit new
fast-food restaurants -- a tactic that could be called health zoning."
Zoning restrictions on fast-food outlets in towns such as Concord,
Mass. and Calistoga, Calif. are typically based on traffic or aesthetic
concerns, rather than a determination to second-guess what residents
choose to eat. The proposed L.A. restrictions would not be city-wide
but would instead be specifically targeted to the city's poorest
sections in and around South Central. Mark Vallianatos, director of
something called the Center for Food and Justice at Occidental College (more about it), says "bringing health policy and environmental policy together with land-use planning" is "the wave of the future."

Jesus, the Center for Food and Justice?  Another clear leading edge of health care as the Trojan Horse for fascism, which I have been warning against for years.

  • Kevin

    I wonder ... how likely is it that the actual residents of these neighborhoods will fail to see the goodwill behind this law, and instead react as if they're victims of a new Prohibition?

  • milka duno's #1 fan

    Since obesity is a matter of too many calories and too little exercise, it would seem they're going about this the wrong way.

    Instead of banning honest, legitimate businesses, and denying their constituents employment opportunities at said businesses, perhaps the do-gooders might look at informing their constituents about portion control, and promoting exercise opportunities.

    Naaahhh... that makes too much sense. Who am I kidding? I'm sorry for bringing logic into this. I'll just shut up now, and let the politicians resume their business of protecting the existing businesses at the expense of their constituents.

  • milka duno's #1 fan

    Since obesity is a matter of too many calories and too little exercise, it would seem they're going about this the wrong way.

    Instead of banning honest, legitimate businesses, and denying their constituents employment opportunities at said businesses, perhaps the do-gooders might look at informing their constituents about portion control, and promoting exercise opportunities.

    Naaahhh... that makes too much sense. Who am I kidding? I'm sorry for bringing logic into this. I'll just shut up now, and let the politicians resume their business of protecting the existing businesses at the expense of their constituents.

  • milka duno's #1 fan

    Since obesity is a matter of too many calories and too little exercise, it would seem they're going about this the wrong way.

    Instead of banning honest, legitimate businesses, and denying their constituents employment opportunities at said businesses, perhaps the do-gooders might look at informing their constituents about portion control, and promoting exercise opportunities.

    Naaahhh... that makes too much sense. Who am I kidding? I'm sorry for bringing logic into this. I'll just shut up now, and let the politicians resume their business of protecting the existing businesses at the expense of their constituents.

  • markm

    Fast food restaurants are also a major source of jobs for the poor - by restricting them near poor neighborhoods, the "progressives" are also making it harder for the working poor to get to their jobs, and in effect reserving more of the jobs for teenaged middle class children.

    Who first said something like this, "When you see someone intending to do good to you, run"?

  • http://www.heart-watch-blog.com/ Kelly

    I think the obesity epidemic and its related illnesses, including high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease.